Monday, November 26, 2012

Axioms: IV. Law of Relative Truth


“The Magician’s Companion: A Practical & Encyclopedic Guide to Magical & Religious
Symbolism”
Bill Whitcomb, 1997
Llyewellyn Publications


IV. Law of Relative Truth

Every statement is true in one sense, false in one sense and meaningless in one sense. This is the function of one’s vantage point (world view). In words of Hassan Ibn Sabbah, “Nothing is true.  Everything is permissible.”

          This is one of those things that is so interesting. Take for example: I was making a deposit at a bank some years back. There was a guy in the line behind me that kept making me have goose bumps. I felt extremely uneasy. I got up to the teller window and handed the lady my check. The guy that was behind me went to the window next to me. He handed his 'deposit' slip to the teller. She turned very pale faced then handed him all the money that was in her booth. He grabbed the money and started to run... dropping his gun on the floor. He grabbed it before running away. (for anyone who hasn't been in this situation it SUCKS! you will spend HOURS upon HOURS locked down in the bank.)

          So they started questioning everyone on what they saw. What was interesting was that everyone saw and heard something different... some were only slightly different while others were wildly different. But each person saw something through their 'world view' and it was the holy truth for them. They were all correct from their perception but all incorrect on what actually happened.

          One of the things I noticed was that the gun when it dropped made a very funny sound... like a plastic gun instead of a metal one. I also noticed a strange looking orange tip. But I couldn't recall the mans face only that he was tall, white, shabby looking, and smelled like old cigars. When I was questioned I repeated what I recalled. And part of what I recalled was correct... oddly enough I was the only one that recalled it. You see they had already caught the guy just a few blocks away from the bank. He was tall, he was white, and he had a toy gun with an orange tip. So my truth of what happened was correct to a point, false to another, and the smell... well that was completely meaningless.

          But no one else noticed it was a toy gun... some even thought it was a knife.
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